FIS NORDIC JUNIOR & U23 WORLD SKI CHAMPIONSHIPS LIBEREC 2013

20.-27.1.2013 LIBEREC, CZECH REPUBLIC

Monday 28.07.
FIS NORDIC JUNIOR & U23 WORLD SKI CHAMPIONSHIPS LIBEREC 2013
FIS NORDIC JUNIOR & U23 WORLD SKI CHAMPIONSHIPS LIBEREC 2013
FIS NORDIC JUNIOR & U23 WORLD SKI CHAMPIONSHIPS LIBEREC 2013
FIS NORDIC JUNIOR & U23 WORLD SKI CHAMPIONSHIPS LIBEREC 2013
Main partners ČPP GHC Tipsport Partners Sportinvest Skicomp Alpine Pro Hyundai Babylon Hotel Arena SPORT PARK LIBEREC Hertz ČTK Fotobanka OC Forum Media partners ČT 4 Sport ČRO Radiožurnál Sport.cz Snow

Junior World Championships


HISTORY 

The Junior World Ski Championships under 20 years of age in Nordic skiing have had a rather complicated history. All three disciplines - Cross Country Skiing, Ski Jumping and the Nordic Combined - met for the first time at one event in Germany, in Reit im Winkl in 1991. 

The first discipline to organise its own championships was the Nordic Combined, which hosted the first race for the junior title in 1968 in the French resort of Morez Les Rousses.

Ski jumpers joined the Nordic Combined for the first time in 1979 in Mt. St. Anne in Canada and remained up until 1991. That year, the Cross Country skiers joined the two disciplines and the foundations of the World Championships were laid.

 

15 RACES ON THE SCHEDULE 

Despite this skiing union, there was a recent event when the disciplines had to be split as in the old days and the Championships took place in two different countries. This was in 2009, when Chamonix cancelled the organisation at short notice and substitute organisers in Štrbské pleso in Slovakia (Ski Jumping, Nordic Combined) and Praz de Lys Sommand in France (Cross Country) had to act quickly. There was a similar situation in 2008, when adverse weather conditions thwarted the Championships in Poland - Ski Jumping took place in Zakopane, but the Cross Country moved to Szczyrk and the Italian venue of Malles-Val Venosta. 

The number of races gradually increased. Up until 1999, the set-up was fixed - boys six races and ladies only two. In 2000, Štrbské pleso offered eleven races, Karpacz-Szklarska Poreba thirteen and Malles - Val Venosta in 2008 increased the number to sixteen (due to snow and weather conditions all the Ski Jumping and Nordic Combined events had to be moved to Zakopane a month later).

In Erzurum in 2012 and in Liberec 2013, the number of races was settled at fifteen - eight races of Cross Country skiing, four in Ski Jumping and three races of the Nordic Combined.

 

A PARADE OF RENOWNED ATHLETES

The Junior World Ski Championships are attended by 650 participants from 35 countries of four continents - apart from traditional countries, there are also athletes from Australia, New Zealand, Argentina, China and Mongolia. Each country may register four athletes.

Since the very beginning, the JWSC have been attended by skiers who have over consequent years become great skiing legends of their sport.  Several names have recently gone down in the history of their disciplines. Among the champions or medallists have been e. g. the Cross Country skiers Petter Norhug, Lukáš Bauer, Tor Arne Hetland, Kateřina Neumannová, Marit Björgen, Therese Johaug; Ski Jumpers Sven Hannawald, Janne Ahonen, Thomas Morgenstern, Gregor Schlierenzauer or Nordic Combined champions were Samppa Lajunen, Anssi Koivuranta, Hannu Manninen, Alessandro Pittin and many others.

It is evident that the Junior World Ski Championships are a unique opportunity for future stars on the skiing trails.


RUSSIA'S LAST DOMINATION

Neither Norway nor Sweden dominated the previous JWSC 2012 in the Turkish town of Erzurum. The landslide victory belonged to Russia with a medal balance of 6-3-2 before Slovenia 2-2-2 and Japan 2-0-0.

 

HOST TOWNS OF NORDIC JUNIOR WORLD SKI CHAMPIONSHIPS:


2012 – Erzurum, Turkey
 

Number of disciplines: 15 (ladies 6, men 9) 

2011 – Otepää, Estonia 

Number of disciplines: 13 (ladies 5, men 8) 

2010 – Hinterzarten, Germany 

Number of disciplines: 14 (ladies 5, men 9)

2009 – Praz de Lys Sommand, France (CC)/ Štrbské pleso, Slovakia (SJ, NC) 

Number of disciplines: 14 (ladies 5, men 9) 

2008 – Malles/Val Venosta, Italy (CC)/Zakopané, Poland (SJ, NC)

Number of disciplines: 16 (ladies 6, men 10)

2007 – Tarvisio, Italy 

Number of disciplines: 14 (ladies 5, men 9) 

2006 – Kranj, Slovenia 

Number of disciplines: 14 (ladies 5, men 9)

2005 – Rovaniemi, Finland 

Number of disciplines: 13 (ladies 4, men 9)

2004 – Stryn, Norway 

Number of disciplines: 13 (ladies 4, men 9)

2003 – Solleftea, Sweden 

Number of disciplines: 13 (ladies 4, men 9)

2002 – Schonach, Germany 

Number of disciplines: 10 (ladies 3, men 7)

2001 – Karpacz-Szklarska, Poland 

Number of disciplines: 13 (ladies 4, men 9) 

2000 – Štrbské pleso, Slovakia 

Number of disciplines: 11 (ladies 3, men 8) 

1999 – Saalfelden, Austria 

Number of disciplines: 8 (ladies 2, men 6) 

1998 – St. Moritz/Pontresina, Switzerland

Number of disciplines: 8 (ladies 2, men 6) 

1997 – Canmore, Canada 

Number of disciplines: 8 (ladies 2, men 6)

1996 – Asiago, Italy 

Number of disciplines: 8 (ladies 2, men 6)

1995 – Gaellivare, Sweden 

Number of disciplines: 8 (ladies 2, men 6) 

1994 – Breitenwang, Austria 

Number of disciplines: 8 (ladies 2, men 6)

1993 – Harrachov, Czech Republic

Number of disciplines: 8 (ladies 2, men 6)

1992 – Vuokatti, Finland 

Number of disciplines: 10 (ladies 3, men 7)

1991 – Reit im Winkl, Germany

Number of disciplines: 10 (ladies 3, men 7) 

1990 – Les Saisies, France (CC)/Štrbské pleso, Slovakia (SJ, NC) 

Number of disciplines: 10 (ladies 3, men 7) 

1989 – Vang/Hamar, Norway (SJ, NC only) 

Number of disciplines: 4 (men only) 

1988 – Saalfelden, Austria (SJ, NC only) 

Number of disciplines: 4 (men only) 

1987 – Asiago, Italy (SJ, NC only) 

Number of disciplines: 4 (men only)

1986 – Lake Placid, USA (SJ, NC only) 

Number of disciplines: 4 (men only) 

1985 – Randa/Täsch/Zermatt, Switzerland (SJ, NC only) 

Number of disciplines: 3 (men only)

1984 – Trondheim, Norway (SJ, NC only) 

Number of disciplines: 3 (men only) 

1983 – Kuopio, Finland (SJ, NC only) 

Number of disciplines: 2 (men only)

1982 – Murau, Austria (SJ, NC only) 

Number of disciplines: 2 (men only)

1981 – Schonach, Germany (SJ, NC only) 

Number of disciplines: 2 (men only)

1980 – Oernskoeldsvik, Sweden (SJ, NC only) 

Number of disciplines: 2 (men only)

1979 – Mt. St. Anne, Canada (SJ, NC only) 

Number of disciplines: 2 (men only) 

1978 – Murau, Austria (NC only) 

Number of disciplines: 1 (men only)

1977 – Sainte Croix, Switzerland (NC only) 

Number of disciplines: 1 (men only)

1976 – Liberec, Czech Republic (NC only)

Number of disciplines: 1 (men only)

1975 – Lieto, Finland (NC only)

Number of disciplines: 1 (men only) 

1974 – Autrans, France (NC only)

Number of disciplines: 1 (men only)

1973 – Kavgolovo, USSR (NC only)

Number of disciplines: 1 (men only)

1972 – Tarvisio, Italy (NC only)

Number of disciplines: 1 (men only)

1971 – Nesselwang/Allgäu, Federal Republic of Germany (NC only)

Number of disciplines: 1 (men only) 

1970 – Gosau am Dachstein, Austria (NC only)

Number of disciplines: 1 (men only) 

1969 – Bollnaes, Sweden (NC only)

Number of disciplines: 1 (men only) 

1968 – Morez-Les Rousses, France (NC only)

Number of disciplines: 1 (men only)